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THE DIGITAL ECONOMY IN THE EU

Curso 2019/2020/Subject's code26600097

THE DIGITAL ECONOMY IN THE EU

NAME SUBJECT THE DIGITAL ECONOMY IN THE EU
CODE 26600097
SESSION 2019/2020
DEGREE IN WHICH IT IS OFFERED MÁSTER UNIVERSITARIO EN UNIÓN EUROPEA
TYPE CONTENIDOS
ECTS 5
HOURS 125.0
PERIOD SEMESTRE  2
OFFER LANGUAGES INGLÉS

PRESENTACIÓN Y CONTEXTUALIZACIÓN

The digital economy is developing rapidly worldwide. It is the single most important driver of innovation, competitiveness and growth, and it holds huge potential for European entrepreneurs and small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs). Unfortunately, only two percent of European enterprises are currently taking full advantage of new digital opportunities. How European businesses adopt digital technologies will be a key determinant of their future growth.

These trends enable more than just technological innovation. They spur innovation in business models, business networking and the transfer of knowledge and access to international markets.

To acquire knowledge of the challenges of the new digital economy in the EU context is fundamental within the framework of the Official Master's Degree in European Union Studies. It is a basic premise to understanding how EU economy will evolve and how Member States, EU Institutions, EU enterprises and EU citizens take part in that process.

Two billion people are currently connected to the internet and by 2016, this number will exceed 3 billion – almost half of the world’s population.

Businesses that fail to get digitally connected will become excluded from the global market.

The huge potential of the digital economy is underexploited in Europe, with 41% of enterprises being non-digital, and only two percent taking full advantage of digital opportunities. New digital opportunities create new business opportunities. Now that youth unemployment has risen to over 20% in the EU (and to over 55% in Spain and Greece), the growth prospects offered by the digital economy in Europe are promising.

Other regions of the world are already ahead of the game. The digital economy now contributes up to eight percent of the GDP of the G-20 major economies, powering growth and creating jobs. Over the last five years, the development of mobile applications alone has created nearly 500 000 new jobs in the US, implying strong employment growth prospects. That type of growth is not seen across the EU. It is estimated that 1.5 million additional jobs could be created in the EU digital economy if it mirrors the performance of the US or Sweden. 

Although many EU entrepreneurs are already leveraging digital technologies to create successful businesses and significant economic impact, that number could be increased. This is especially true given that European small businesses grow two to three times faster, and create new jobs when they embrace digital technologies. With the aid of technology, small businesses can also go global from day one, reaching overseas markets and talented potential employees.

Just engaging with customers online seems to create growth: figures have shown that SMEs from many countries that have actively engaged with consumers on the internet have experienced sales growth rates that are up to 22 percentage points higher over three years than those companies in countries with low or no internet presence. By not taking full advantage of digital technologies, EU businesses miss out on the chance to expand and create jobs. It is estimated that if all EU countries mirrored the performance of the USA or the best-performing EU countries, 400,000 to 1.5 million new jobs could be created in the EU internet economy.

New technologies also hold potential for the manufacturing industries. The digitization of manufacturing can transform the entire industry, offering prospects for the re-location of industry in Europe. The digital economy will reach EUR 3.2 trillion in the G-20 economies and already contributes up to eight per cent of GDP, powering growth and creating jobs. In addition, over 75% of the value added created by the Internet is in traditional industries, due to higher productivity gains.

The course will have a theoretical and a practical dimension. The study of the framework, actions and perspectives of the EU in the digital economy will be supplemented with a view of the concrete and practical enterprise actions and how to be, as company or citizen, been involved in the digital economy explosion. Specific approaches to each business area/sector will be followed by a study of their own dynamics.

This subject is targeted to actual or future professionals with a diversity of profiles: EU business professionals, entrepreneurs, law experts, EU civil servants, National or Regional civil servants dealing with EU issues, etc. It can also be useful to managers and decision-makers working for all kind of enterprises, political organizations and private or public companies.

Finally, special regard will be paid to students interested in conducting research on EU business, digital economy and innovation.

 

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